What is the current status of the municipal bonds approved by voters in 2014 and 2018? What capacity does the City have to undertake future debt?

The 2014 bond referendum authorized General Obligation Bonds for projects totaling $139.2 million. 
The bonds were issued (sold) in stages as the projects progress: $54.7 million in 2016, $59 million in 2017, and $25.5 million in 2020.

The 2018 bond referendum authorized General Obligation Bonds for projects totaling $122 million. 
The bonds were issued (sold) in stages as the projects progressed: $35 million in 2020, and $55 million in 2023. The City has $32 million in authorized 2018 General Obligation Bonds that have not yet been issued (sold). The City will issue the bonds when needed to provide funding for the authorized projects.

The attached document is information as to General Obligation Bond indebtedness and the principal and interest payments for fiscal year 203 and fiscal year 2024. Additional information about the City's outstanding debt (including other types of bonds and obligations) is included in the note disclosures in the Annual Comprehensive Financial Report (ACFR). The Fiscal Year 2022 ACFR is available on the City's website. The Fiscal Year 2023 ACFR will be available on the City's website later this month (January 2024).

City Future Debt Capacity
The City has capacity for additional General Obligation Bonds in the future. The amount of capacity is estimated yearly in the Spring as part of the budget development process and is dependent upon a variety of factors including but not limited to the amount of unspent bond funds on hand, the amount of unissued bonds, progress of existing projects, capacity to complete additional projects, funds available in the Debt Service Fund, and various credit rating metrics (for example, debt per capita). The City's General Obligation Bonds are AAA rated by three major rating agencies. During our last review, the City's capacity to issue General Obligation Debt without a tax increase was approximately $50 million. Future general obligation debt authorizations are subject to the factors listed above and may change annually.

General Obligation Bonds (other than two-thirds general obligation bonds) require a vote of the citizens via referendum. There are other types of debt instruments that do not require a referendum such as revenue bonds, limited obligation bonds, etc.

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1. How many incidents of gun violence are there citywide?
2. How can I install a political banner on the University Pkwy Pedestrian Bridge?
3. Is there a dedicated staff person within the City that keeps up with homeless encampments? Are those encampments documented in a map or other form?
4. How are land use permits catalogued with the Planning Board and/or City Council (whether or not there is a change in zoning)?
5. What does a citizen do to obtain a copy of a permit subdividing land?
6. If the City issues no more bonds until January 2027 what would be a reasonable assumption as to bonding capacity at that time?
7. Is the increased value of the grand list during such time a consideration in the determination of capacity?
8. What is the current status of the municipal bonds approved by voters in 2014 and 2018? What capacity does the City have to undertake future debt?
9. What are the City's policies related to political signs?
10. What is the Winston-Salem City Council form of government?
11. Where can I find a map showing the ward boundaries?
12. Where can I find the current and previous annual budgets?
13. Where can I find the city organizational chart?
14. What is the population of Winston-Salem?
15. What are the hours of CityLink?